Monday, June 28, 2010

Free Pattern Sunday


I don't know about you but this hot weather makes me want to spend my days in front of a huge fan. And what better why to accommodate that but to knit. Or maybe that is just my excuse. Either why at least I'm knitting and trying to be cool. Sometimes the heat makes it hard for me to knit with wool and as I'm sure many of you experience this too, I thought it would be a perfect time to put up a pattern featuring a non wool yarn. This post's free pattern is a little mesh purse. Great for those hot nights when you just want to carry a few things.


Be Sweet Bamboo or Alchemy 'Silk Purse' 1 ball.
Size 6 16" circular needles and size dpns



CO 60 and join in the round, don't twist!
Knit 5 rounds
Next round: *K3, Yo, K2tog *, repeat *--* around
Next round: Purl

Round 1: *Yo, K2tog *, repeat *--* around
Round 2: Knit
Repeat rounds 1 and 2 for 5-6".

Purl 1 round.

Round 1: * K10, K2tog *, repeat *--* around
Round 2 and all even rounds: Knit
Round 3: *K9, K2tog *,
repeat *--* around
Round 5: *K8, Ktog *,
repeat *--* around
Round 7: *K7, K2tog *,
repeat *--* around
Round 9: *K6, K2tog *,
repeat *--* around Round 11: *K5, K2tog *, repeat *--* around Cut and pull yarn through the remaining stitches. Weave in ends. String ribbon through eyelets near top of pouch. Enjoy!

Friday, June 25, 2010

Covered Objects

I keep coming across objects that have been covered in fiber. Felted, crocheted, knitted objects of all sorts like beach pebbles and metal necklace babbles.

The above jewerely is designed by Jensen-Conroy. The design duo debuted their knit covered pieces last year at one store in New York and have recently expanded to a few more spots. For a but more information go here.


I've also stumbled across these ocean pebbles that have been knitted over and then felted. They much such cute little desk top paper weights, or home accessories. The maker of these pebble objects is Bugheart who blogs at Sew Green. Read her full blog post here.


And then of course there is the talented crafter Margaret Oomen. In addition to her amazing aesthetics she has been at the forefront of the crocheted rock trend. I've been admiring her fabric and crochet rocks for some time now. Check out her blog, Resurrection Fern, for more fun things and interesting observations. Plus she has even posted a tutorial on felting rocks here using roving. Right now I am loving her crochet glass pieces.


Making your own felt rocks would be a fun project to do, with the kids or the kid in you, after a day at the beach escaping the summer heat to memorialize the day. We have tons of roving in lots of fun colors or maybe you prefer to keep the colors in natural tones. Either way this sounds like a fun project.

--Ramona

Wind Powered Knitting Machines

I just came across this video of a London Art students' project -- a tubular knitting machine powered by a metal windmill. The artist, Merel Karhof, then divides up the tubes and sells individual scarves with labels telling how long it took to make the 2 meter scarf.

For more information on the process and how the idea came about go here. It's such a good idea, but holds a different type of aw than something lovingly knit by hand.

Wind Powered Knitting Machine from Frankie Thom on Vimeo.



--Ramona

Sunday, June 20, 2010

Knit in Public Day Fun

Yesterday we all had lots of fun down at Depot Park, where we were celebrating the annual Knit in Public Day. It was nice to sit back n' relax, while knitting and enjoying everyone's company. Some of us even used Jonatha's hula hoops for a little exercise to break up our knitting--always good for those wrists.

Thanks to everyone who came down to knit in the park with us.

Here are some photos of the event. If you have any to share, send us a copy and will put them up.

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Saturday, June 12, 2010

Come to our Knit in Public Day event!
(click on image below to enlarge)

Sunday, June 6, 2010

Free Pattern Sunday



We wanted to share with you another one of our favorite shop patterns. The Angora Baby Booties! These are such fun to knit with Malabrigo's Angora yarn. It seems like lots of folk are getting ready for a new baby or have just had a baby. These make ideal gifts for knitters of all skill levels.

Enjoy!



Angora Baby Booties
1 skein Malabrigo Angora
Size 7 needles
Abbreviations:
K2tog = knit 2 stitches together
P2tog = purl 2 stitches together
k2tog-tbl = knit 2 stitches together through
the back of loop
p2tog-tbl = purl 2 stitches together through
the back of loop
Yo = yarn over
Pm = place stitch marker
Sm = slip stitch marker

Cast on 25 (29, 33, 35)

K8 (10, 10, 12) rows.

Begin Decreases:
K10 (12, 14, 15), K2tog, Pm, K1, Pm,

K2tog-tbl, K10 (12, 14, 15).

P9 (11, 13, 14), P2tog-tbl, Sm, P1, Sm, P2tog, P9 (11, 13, 14).

Remembering to slip st markers as you
come to them, continue decrease pattern
until 17 (19, 21, 23) stitches remain.

Optional Eyelet Row:
Knit all stitches.

Small: P1, Yo, [P1, P2tog, Yo] x2, P3, [Yo, P2tog, P1] x2, Yo, P1. (19 sts)

Medium: P2tog, Yo, [P1, P2tog, Yo] x2, P3, [Yo, P2tog, P1] x2, Yo, P2tog. (19 sts)

Large: P2tog, Yo, [P1, P2tog, Yo] x2, P5, [Yo, P2tog, P1] x2, Yo, P2tog. (21 sts)

X-Large: P2, Yo, [P1, P2tog, Yo] x2, P5, [Yo, P2tog, P1] x2, Yo, P2. (23 sts)

Knit all stitches.

Ribbed Cuff:
(For a tidy rib edge, slip 1st stitch of every
row.)

K1, P1; repeat across all stitches.

Continue in established rib pattern, knitting the knits and purling the purls, for total of 8
(10, 12, 12) rows. If you did not knit eyelet row, continue for two extra rows.

Loosely, bind off in rib pattern.
Sew back and bottom of bootie. Whipstitch works well for seaming booties, as it leaves a flat seam.

Cording:
Cut about 100” of yarn. Double it and tie one knot at each end. Insert a needle (or pencil) into each knot. Holding one needle stationary, turn other needle clockwise, until a tight twist has been made. Keep strands taught, fold in half, allowing cord to twist onto itself. Untie knots. Tie new knots 1 1/2” from edge, cut ends. Thread one end with tapestry needle and bring up through knots, repeat on all ends. Cut loops. Repeat at other end of cord.